The art of finding the best PR key messages

Good key messages can be elusive – just like Perigord truffles. 

As any keen foodie will know, the Perigord – or French – truffle (Tuber melanosporum) is a species of truffle native to Southern Europe. It is one of the most expensive edible mushrooms in the world.

They are very elusive and are typically found near the roots of oak and hazlenut trees.  New Zealand has a small truffle industry, including Kings Truffles in the beautiful limestone hills of Waipara, North Canterbury.

My husband and I recently attended a truffle hunting excursion at the truffery, followed by a divine truffle-filled lunch at the nearby Black Estate winery.  It was a foodie's dream come true!

Anyway, back to key messages.  The truffle hunting session got me thinking about the similarities with key messages.

Just like truffles, which can look very plain, key messages' power lies in their simplicity.  In fact, they are so simple that each message should distill down to a single core concept.

If you have duplicate core concepts in your messages, then refine the duplicated messages to just one.

Six is the magic number!  If you have more than six key messages on the topic, then you have too many.

Key messages are a powerful tool for framing your communication and keeping it on track, so be sure to use them.  It is surprising how often people forget to do this. 

Forgetting to use your key messages would be like serving this delicious truffled duck and mash dish...without the truffle!

In case you are wondering, the truffles we found had a distinctive fruity aroma and taste – almost like a cross between pink bubble gum and mushroom.  I have read descriptions of them having garlicky notes, but this wasn't evident in the ones we found.

We'll never match Freddy's ability to sniff out truffles, but we're great at sniffing out winning key messages!  We can develop key messages as part of a wider public relations plan, or hold a workshop that just focuses on key messages

Contact us to find out more.  

 

 

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Freddy the truffle hound quickly found some.  Her owner Jax then sniffed the ground before digging because truffles are under-ripe if their aroma cannot be detected by a human nose.

Freddy the truffle hound quickly found some.  Her owner Jax then sniffed the ground before digging because truffles are under-ripe if their aroma cannot be detected by a human nose.

Jax carefully scraped off 1 or 2 cm of soil and one of several truffles in this 'nest' began to emerge (top centre).

Jax carefully scraped off 1 or 2 cm of soil and one of several truffles in this 'nest' began to emerge (top centre).

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